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TakeStock
March 28th, 2009, 01:20 PM
I?ve heard negative and some not-so-negative stories about people?s experiences with the vent tube. But I?m still unclear as to what it actually feels like in your throat. Does it compare with any other experience? I?ve had a TEE down the other orifice ? does it kind of feel the same in your windpipe?

Are you able to breathe through your nose while the vent tube is in? Can you breathe through your mouth, or does the tube completely block the windpipe and all air must go through it? How difficult is it to swallow? Does moving your head from side to side hurt? Can you move your head up and down easily?

The tube I?ve seen in pictures looks fairly narrow ? can you inhale and exhale enough air or do you feel at times like, as someone said, you?re breathing through a straw?

The nurse I talked to during pre-admission also warned that they may be using a nasogastric tube (nose-to-stomach) which doesn?t thrill me. Did anyone wake up with one of those?

ponytaila1a
March 28th, 2009, 01:23 PM
WOW Bill......I keep going over and over those same questions in my head....thanks for starting the thread.....I've read many, many concerning the tube here....but yours is more specific......we both are obsessing!!! :D

Adrienne
March 28th, 2009, 01:38 PM
Most likely you will be so doped up, you won't even think about whether you are breathing on your own or not, etc., etc.

I do remember trying to cough and not being able to make a sound, but other than that, I just listened to the good news my husband and then my surgeon told me, gave the thumbs-up sign, and then went back into la-la land.

DeWayne
March 28th, 2009, 01:42 PM
the breathing tube for me I have no recollection. It came out immediately upon my waking up after surgery. As for the nose to stomach one, I had one of those after colon surgery last Nov. the worst part was when they pulled it out. Other than that it didn't bother me.

TakeStock
March 28th, 2009, 01:42 PM
WOW Bill......I keep going over and over those same questions in my head....thanks for starting the thread.....I've read many, many concerning the tube here....but yours is more specific......we both are obsessing!!! :D

Jennifer, yeah, I hear a lot of "it doesn't hurt" or "it does hurt" but nothing that describes the actual sensation. I'm tempted to stick a straw in my windpipe just to see how it feels. :) I hate going into something with no idea on what it will feel like.

Hopefully, someone can explain it. If not, I will make an attempt to describe the sensation as best I can when I make my first post-surgery post next week, for your sake at least. :D

TakeStock
March 28th, 2009, 01:45 PM
Most likely you will be so doped up, you won't even think about whether you are breathing on your own or not, etc., etc.

I do remember trying to cough and not being able to make a sound, but other than that, I just listened to the good news my husband and then my surgeon told me, gave the thumbs-up sign, and then went back into la-la land.

I'm hoping for the same experience. When I came out of slumberland after my TEE a couple weeks ago, I couldn't feel much of anything for several minutes. I'm hoping that give me a stronger dose of that happy juice, or something similar.

TakeStock
March 28th, 2009, 01:49 PM
the breathing tube for me I have no recollection. It came out immediately upon my waking up after surgery. As for the nose to stomach one, I had one of those after colon surgery last Nov. the worst part was when they pulled it out. Other than that it didn't bother me.

My mother-in-law had a colon blockage and everything backed up to her stomach. They made several painful attempts to get the nasogastric tube in before a doctor took care of it. She says having it in and getting it out wasn't nearly so bad. But I have no idea why the nurse even mentioned putting it in, so I'm wondering if it's common practice. As it is, I think I'll be getting a tube in almost every orifice, and a couple in my chest that didn't use to be orifices. :eek:

njean
March 28th, 2009, 01:51 PM
I'm hoping for the same experience. When I came out of slumberland after my TEE a couple weeks ago, I couldn't feel much of anything for several minutes. I'm hoping that give me a stronger dose of that happy juice, or something similar.

Let me just put it this way, if I try explaining WHAT it feels like to be intubated, you may not want to go ahead with your surgery!!!

So, it's best NOT to push it any further, my opinion!!! (you are usually asleep through out this time & if you do wake up from time to time, you'll be so groggy that you'll just slip away again!)

Don't worry ---- you'll survive the intubation!!!

TakeStock
March 28th, 2009, 02:20 PM
Let me just put it this way, if I try explaining WHAT it feels like to be intubated, you may not want to go ahead with your surgery!!!

So, it's best NOT to push it any further, my opinion!!! (you are usually asleep through out this time & if you do wake up from time to time, you'll be so groggy that you'll just slip away again!)

Don't worry ---- you'll survive the intubation!!!

Now is that supposed to make me less worried? :eek:

I'm not concerned about the pain and discomfort so much as HOW it will feel and how I can cope with the experience. My fear is I'll panic and be uncertain of how to "breathe" correctly. I suspect I'll be too groggy to panic and the nurse will be right there, but just in case, I want to be able to talk myself down. I remember panicking a bit when I had my first TEE because I wasn't used to the oxygen going up my nostrils and I couldn't swallow after the numbing spray, which made me feel like I was choking. Breathing on my own through my nose calmed me down, but I had never read about the choking sensation you can get from not being able to feel yourself swallowing, so I was unprepared. I hate being unprepared. :(

Mary
March 28th, 2009, 02:23 PM
I never felt it, Bill, so quit worrying!:)

acr
March 28th, 2009, 02:25 PM
Personally I'd not stress about it. I woke up in critical care, but was in the twilight zone courtesy of the drugs. I have a vague recollection of the vent tube being removed but I was so out of it that I didn't care, and I suspect you'll be the same.

nancym
March 28th, 2009, 02:33 PM
I had the tube in for several hours after surgery, and what I remember of it is that it felt like I had this huge plastic tube in my throat which was uncomfortable, but not painful. The worst part was trying to swallow and feeling like I was gagging. It was not a pleasant experience, but not horrible. Hopefully you'll have it out before you ever become aware that it's in.

njean
March 28th, 2009, 02:35 PM
Now is that supposed to make me less worried? :eek:

I'm not concerned about the pain and discomfort so much as HOW it will feel and how I can cope with the experience. My fear is I'll panic and be uncertain of how to "breathe" correctly. I suspect I'll be too groggy to panic and the nurse will be right there, but just in case, I want to be able to talk myself down. I remember panicking a bit when I had my first TEE because I wasn't used to the oxygen going up my nostrils and I couldn't swallow after the numbing spray, which made me feel like I was choking. Breathing on my own through my nose calmed me down, but I had never read about the choking sensation you can get from not being able to feel yourself swallowing, so I was unprepared. I hate being unprepared. :(

I'm sorry if I came across a bit too strong for you Bill; believe me, that was not my intention!

What I'm trying to get across I guess, is that it's hard to explain how exactly it feels & how you will react to the intubation since everyone is so different.

Some people have almost no notion of having the intubator in while others, like myself, woke up in a panic & I had to be strapped down to the bed to keep me calm.

The one thing I had to keep reminding myself when & I awoke knowing it was there, I tried praying & calming myself down that way & also, telling myself that it was NOT going to be in there forever.

Hopefully you will be one of those that will have no notion of it being there & everything will go smooth. If the opposite happens, then try to focus on something else to get yourself in a calm state of mind!

WayneGM
March 28th, 2009, 02:44 PM
I never felt it either. I had worried about it but it ended up a non-event.

Ross
March 28th, 2009, 02:47 PM
I've been intubated more then I care to mention. I lived with the thing fully conscience for 10 days, then I was trached. It's a fullness feeling in your throat. You cannot breath in anyway except through and with the tube. It is very uncomfortable to move your head in any direction because your pulling on the tube while it's locked in your windpipe.

Should you find yourself awake with it still in, do not fight breathing against it. Try to time your breaths with the ventilator timings themselves. Should be 16 breaths per minute whether you want them or not.

The nasogastric tube is a non concern. They should insert it while your out which is the worst part of all. I've had it both ways and would much rather be out. Pulling it out is a little uncomfortable, but it's nothing compared to inserting it fully awake.

As everyones mentioned, you'll be so drugged out of your mind that you probably won't remember any of this.

TakeStock
March 28th, 2009, 02:47 PM
Thanks folks. I'm not so much stressed right now, just trying to make sure I don't have a reaction like Norma's. I will probably avoid swallowing -- I have a tendency to try to swallow when I'm stressed -- as Nancy describes, as it might trigger a gag reflex (mine is fairly strong). They told me I would be strapped down in advance, but I probably wouldn't consciously reach for the tube even in a panic. But thanks for the advice of focusing away from the sensation, Norma. I will try. I'll tell me wife to keep talking to me while all this is going on -- that should distract me, or at least put me back to sleep. :)

Ross
March 28th, 2009, 02:50 PM
You can't swallow. Your entire windpipe is full of plastic blocking it off.

Oh yeah, to help with removal if you should be awake enough to know, be sure to strongly exhale as they pull it out. This will help expand your larynx and throat which will keep sore throats and such to a minimum.

Bridgette
March 28th, 2009, 02:51 PM
Yeah, same. It was a non event...it wasn't even one of my presurgery worries.
Try not to dwell on it because if you do, you will make it into this huge event which it actually isn't. It is very likely that you will still be so out of it that you will hardly notice it when they remove it. And I remember it didn't feel uncomfortable as such - more like just a slightly weird sensation. Keep still and just go with the flow...

TakeStock
March 28th, 2009, 02:53 PM
Thanks, Ross. That's exactly what I wanted!

halleyg
March 28th, 2009, 02:54 PM
Whatever it feels like (good description Ross), it is only temporary. I was awake both times with mine and honestly hated every second of it, but just remember it is coming out eventually. Best advice is just bear with it while it's in there and don't try to fight it.

olefin
March 28th, 2009, 02:58 PM
I?ve heard negative and some not-so-negative stories about people?s experiences with the vent tube. But I?m still unclear as to what it actually feels like in your throat. Does it compare with any other experience?

Before AVR, doctors looked in my stomach 3 different times using a Gastroscopy. During AVR they looked in my lungs once due to a collapsed lung ... neither is no match to the ventilator tube.



Are you able to breathe through your nose while the vent tube is in? Can you breathe through your mouth, or does the tube completely block the windpipe and all air must go through it?
Breathing is the purpose of the ventilator... it does it for you.
How difficult is it to swallow? Very difficult!

Does moving your head from side to side hurt? Can you move your head up and down easily?
You can't do anything easy while on the ventilator!

During my AVR I was put on the ventilator 3 different times, the last time I was fully conscience when they intubated me and was on it 5 days. I guarantee that intubation while conscience is no fun!

Most likely your surgery will be routine. You will be unconsciousness when they cram that tube down you and you will be so druggie when they take it out that you won't remember a thing.

Ross, can tell you more than I can for he was on a ventilator many times longer than me.

sue943
March 28th, 2009, 03:03 PM
I have no recollection of it at all. The first I was aware of was a male voice asking someone why I was still there and thinking to myself "Yep, I woke up then". I was then moved from ICU to the high dependency unit. No memories at all of anything else in ICU.

Eva
March 28th, 2009, 04:25 PM
Most likely you will be so doped up, you won't even think about whether you are breathing on your own or not, etc., etc....


I'm hoping for the same experience. When I came out of slumberland after my TEE a couple weeks ago, I couldn't feel much of anything for several minutes. I'm hoping that give me a stronger dose of that happy juice, or something similar.

You can ask them to give you that happy juice. I told the anesthesioologist I was too anxious and yet oversensitive to pain and medication....and I do NOT REMEMBER/FELT anything about the TEE which was done the morning of my surgery nor the tube when put down or removed!

Lynlw
March 28th, 2009, 04:54 PM
I didn't have heart surgery, but a couple years ago I had robotic gall bladder removal, I didn't occure to me (stupid me, and YES I ask a million questions is JUSTIN is having surgery, but kind of ignore anything for me) that they would vent me for the surgery, but I woke up and felt something blocking my throat and I tried to take a deep breath, couldn't breath or talk or swallow,and kind of was panicing for a second, THEN I thought, hey this must be a vent so relaxed and went back to sleep. After really woke up, I thought maybe it was a weird dream, so asked if I was on the vent and they told me yes.

JeffM
March 28th, 2009, 05:01 PM
I think I was more worried about the breathing tube than anything. You're so drugged, you hardly remember it and they take it out as soon as they're comfortable you can breath on your own. Minor inconvenience at worst.

Faye
March 28th, 2009, 07:25 PM
The best advice I received and used was "If you wake up and are aware of the vent, breathe with it not against it"

I woke up after surgery with the vent tube - I can't say it hurt. It was a little uncomfortable - a full feeling in the throat and a feeling that I wasn't getting enough air but as soon as I remembered to relax and "breathe with it" I was fine.

Soon I was back asleep and when I woke up again, the tube was gone.

Ask your caregiver to remind you to "breathe with it" and all should be well.

aussigal
March 28th, 2009, 07:43 PM
I had it in for about 5 days and was slightly awake when I remember them telling me to cough and they took it out and I could feel what felt like a string with ping-pong balls attatched to it come out of my throat...didnt hurt just felt a little weird...if you ever fight the vent and get distressed they just push the drugs button and you are back to la-la land within a second. I fought the vent a lot so they tell me and they frequently had to drug me back up and send me off to la-la land and yet I absolutely do not remember being distressed by the vent at all.
I also had the NG feeding tube for a week or so...I remember the funny tatse of that yellow mixture they fed me...it was almost a vanilla & banana custard type flavour...I dont remember it being awful when they removed it.

cp172
March 28th, 2009, 07:52 PM
When I woke up from surgery I was so drugged I thought the tube was neat. Do not worry.This is not big deal.

BigOwl
March 28th, 2009, 08:12 PM
You can't swallow. Your entire windpipe is full of plastic blocking it off.

Oh yeah, to help with removal if you should be awake enough to know, be sure to strongly exhale as they pull it out. This will help expand your larynx and throat which will keep sore throats and such to a minimum.

This is the best advice I can think of for somebody who finds him or herself awake before and during extubation. For me, after bypass surgery, this was the absolute worst part. I kept feeling like I was suffocating, and as saliva collected around the tube, the bloody "she's in trouble" beeper kept going off and somebody would come over and suction the spit away (lovely image, I know). Fortunately I was awake enough for them to tell me I wasn't dying, but it was a good hour or so before they finally took it out--and now I do remember the "cough" command. But nobody told me anything about trying to breath with the machine rather than being spooked and fighting it.

Needless to say, I remember this part of the experience more than anything else--so being so drugged as to not remember it isn't a universal experience, although it sounds like a much better one!

Between now and AVR I'm going to be chanting the mantra "exhale strongly" over and over again until it's a reflex.

Don't mean to spook you, Bill, but you do sound like the kind of guy who likes to know what the possibilities are. If I have the option this time, I'm going to ask 'em to take it out before I'm conscious enough to know what's going on--or at least let them know what a crappy experience I had last time so someone knows to help mitigate it.

Praline
March 28th, 2009, 09:36 PM
I woke up with the vent. I remember thinking, " Surgery is over! I made it.!!!"
Then I realized I was still on the vent. With my allergies, I has to be succuctioned every once in a while. I was on the vent a while. My hands were tied... I remember thinking, " Okay... I can go back to sleep... can"t pull anything out,...' LOL
Honestly, I was scared to death about this surgery BUT the vent was NOT was I should have been worried about.
Please do not worry about the vent... it is such a minor thing. After all it keeps you alive for all the time though surgery... You will be just fine.

CA Pigg
March 28th, 2009, 09:44 PM
I also remember waking up with the tube in. I was dreading it just as you... I also am a person that likes to know and be prepared. I'm so glad I had found this place and read the experience of others so I knew what to expect if I was "awake" with it. I remember my family coming in and I tried to write to them with my fingers and I wanted them to take it out. I also tried to convince the nurse to take it out "now" she kept telling me i wasn't ready yet and if she pulled it too soon she would have to put it back in, i kept thinking and letting her know "i don't care", i just want it out and tried to write that out or speak it to her.. Of course she had to wait until I was ready, I just thought of what i needed to do and prayed that it would come out soon, i didnt try to yank it out even though I wanted to, i just took breaths and kept praying and then bam she took it out. By the time my husband came in for next visit it was gone!!! Yes, the best feeling ever was it coming out but just try and have you head right that you do need it and keep calm, it will be out.... Hopefully you won't remember like so many others..........

lilteach3234
March 28th, 2009, 09:45 PM
Bill,

I am two weeks post op and I will say the intubation was my biggest fear. I can tell you I remember nothing about it. I was even re-intubated because I had trouble breathing after they took it out. I remember nothing about either intubation.

Focus your energy on surgery, healing, and feeling better. Don't sweat the breathing tube, because it is in and out before you know it. The drugs take care of the tube.

Please do not worry....and take this from someone who was terrified of the tube.

Ambience
March 29th, 2009, 09:39 AM
I had my surgery in 2001 and I can tell you about my experiences, which wasn't too terrible.

I was pretty doped out when I came to with the ventilator in my throat. I was aware enough to know what was going on, and I remember signaling to the nurse nearby that I was starting to wake up. I felt nauseous, not sure if it was because of being out for almost 10 hours, but I motioned towards my stomach and then out my mouth to let them know I felt like I was going to be sick. Eventually they pulled the tube out and I was sick in a small container. Then I was back out like a light bulb.

It wasn't all that uncomfortable, and was out pretty much in a flash. I doubt I even would have remembered it, if my brain wasn't in survival mode. There will be someone nearby, and they know what to do so don't be too worried about it. I also remember the catheter removal of my neck and down stairs. Both were taken out quick, and although it felt a bit...odd there was no pain.

Chest tubes were slightly annoying, especially as they start walking you the day after surgery, but those also came out quick and painless a few days after surgery.

I'd have to say that the only problems I had were having to go back into the hospital shortly after I was released for water retention, that was a terrible experience but a somewhat rare side-effect. They also put me on an anti-inflammatory that is supposed to have zero side effects, and it made me paranoid and hallucinated.

So obviously the process is very intrusive and some discomfort, but I wouldn't be here typing today if I hadn't gone through the process.

hensylee
March 29th, 2009, 10:10 AM
likely you will be asleep through it all. I woke only once and looked up to see my dear son's eyes staring into mine. I was only glad to see him through his/my tears but unaware of the throat thing. when awake fully, it was gone.

escargome
March 29th, 2009, 10:28 AM
OK, here are my vague rememberances of the vent tube. Woke up after surgery in ICU. Husband by my bed. Told me vent tube was still in. I gave thumbs up although I couldn't feel anything really. Tried to tell him I was thirsty, but then right back to lala land. Sometime later in my haze, nurse said we are taking the vent tube out give me a big cough, I gave a cough, vent tube out. Back to sleep, woke up again, hubby there again, asked for ice chips (still thirsty) given few ice chips, promptly threw up (I won't go into more detail) sufice to say I made it. You will be fine. I will suspect that won't remember most of this part of the recovery.

TakeStock
March 29th, 2009, 10:45 AM
Thanks again everyone for the suggestions and reassurances. I?m sure it will also help others prepare themselves mentally for the experience.

I have some idea of what the tube will feel like. I?ll try to relax and breathe with the ventilator. I?ll try not to think too much of breathing in general because I expect that thinking about it is more likely to cause worry, which will increase my need for oxygen, and, well, make me want to breathe faster. I?ll try to go back to sleep if I feel distressed. And I?ll be ready to exhale/cough when they pull it out if I?m awake.

Sounds like a plan. I feel a lot more prepared and ready to start the adventure.

If anyone else has memories of the experience, please share. Thanks again!

tobagotwo
March 29th, 2009, 11:28 AM
You can write and you can give people the US Hand Signal for Obscene Contempt while intubated, and that covers a surprising number of the needs you may have at that time.

Make sure you have someone there with paper and pen or multiple pencils. They should not leave them while you are unconscious, because the nurse may remove them. The inability to communicate can be frustrating otherwise.

I was awake for quite some time while intubated. They had left it in because I kept passing out from remnants of the anesthesia, and apparently wasn't bothering to breathe during those times. They thought that that oversight by my body might prove to have a detrimental effect, and thus kept me on the ventilator.

However, I was so delighted to have awakened ("I'm alive!") that I let that one positive thought drown out much of everything else. It doesn't hurt to take that in. It's your awakening to the gift of a second chance at this life.

The tube is your friend. It breathed for you, when you could not.

I have an extremely strong gag reflex, and I never gagged on it or felt like it was in a "wrong" place in my throat. It's a very Churchill thing: you have nothing to fear but fear itself. People sometimes panic, because they can't breathe against the machine. However, there's no need to. That machine has been breathing for you for at least three or four hours by the point you are awake, and often for six or more.

Its function is to make certain that you have enough oxygen, and its success at that is constantly being monitored, as you are continuously measured for oxygenation during and after surgery. There is no reason at all for you to suddenly become afraid. After all, you know exactly what it is, and you also know it's kept you alive without any help from you for the last half day or so. A little late to decide you don't want to trust it at this point.

Unfortunately, not all of the machines make any real noise, so you can't necessarily time your breathing to it, as some folks suggest.

I didn't fight mine. I took a vacation and didn't bother to breathe. It was a truly neat thing. You will never be relieved of the duty of breathing for yourself at even the plushest resort you may visit during the rest of your lifetime. At this one time, your entire oxygen needs are fully tended to by the equipment. The ultimate spa.

The tube doesn't hurt, if you're not in it for days and days. It's somewhat restrictive to your head and other movements, but you're not particularly mnotivated to move anyway, as you're drugged. You can't throw up with it, as pretty much everything's blocked. I didn't need to anyway, but I thought I'd mention it, as someone in the past had mentioned trying to, I believe.

People tend to perseverate on this item, and they shouldn't. For the vast majority of people, it will turn out to have been a very minor moment in the scheme of things.

I will say this: do not become physically vehement about its removal. Hospital employees are trained to restrain your hands, if there is concern that you will try to remove it yourself, or if you become unruly in a semi-conscious state. It does seem that most people have it removed while they are still mostly unconscious. If, like me, you have it removed after being fully consciuos and cognizant, be cooperative and patient. Nothing will delay the removal of the tube with more certainty than you insisting that it be done immediately.

Best wishes,

Lynlw
March 29th, 2009, 11:56 AM
Quoting tobagotwo "I didn't fight mine. I took a vacation and didn't bother to breathe. It was a truly neat thing. You will never be relieved of the duty of breathing for yourself at even the plushest resort you may visit during the rest of your lifetime. At this one time, your entire oxygen needs are fully tended to by the equipment. The ultimate spa."

This reminds me of a Simpsons episode. For some reason Homer was staying in a nursing home and was quite happy he didn't have to do much, then he noticed the guy in the other bed had a vent breathing for him. So Homer threw a fit, because why did HE have to breath on his own when other people had a machine that did that for him, he said "and here I am using my own lungs like a fool"


also "The tube doesn't hurt, if you're not in it for days and days. It's somewhat restrictive to your head and other movements, but you're not particularly mnotivated to move anyway, as you're drugged. You can't throw up with it, as pretty much everything's blocked. I didn't need to anyway, but I thought I'd mention it, as someone in the past had mentioned trying to, I believe."

Actually you can, Justin has and I believe others here have too. He was letting us know he had to throw up and the nurses said , don't worry you can't throw up it just feels like it and the next thing we know Justin was, it was quite a mess to clean up.

MaryC
March 29th, 2009, 12:21 PM
I have no memory of being intubated. I was still out of it when it was removed.

Chris

TakeStock
March 29th, 2009, 12:44 PM
This reminds me of Simpsons episode. For some reason Homer was staying in a nursing home and was quite happy he didn't have to do much, then he noticed the guy in the other bed had a vent breathing for him. So Homer threw a fit, because why did HE have to breath on his own when other people had a machine that did that for him, he said "and here I am using my own lungs like a fool"

Here you go. Don't watch if it hurts to laugh:

http://www.hulu.com/watch/31500/the-simpsons-bed-sores#x-4,vclip,23

kschul
March 29th, 2009, 01:06 PM
I appreciated this thread, believe it or not that was one of the things I was most worried about (waking up intubated) Love the Simpson clip, thanks for sharing it made me laugh.

kris

palmaceae
March 29th, 2009, 01:23 PM
I too was worried about it, but I do not remember it at all. All I remember was how difficult it was to breath after it was out and that is why they give you a spirometer.

Lynlw
March 29th, 2009, 01:34 PM
Here you go. Don't watch if it hurts to laugh:

http://www.hulu.com/watch/31500/the-simpsons-bed-sores#x-4,vclip,23

Thanks I was looking for a clip,

Glenda
March 29th, 2009, 02:25 PM
I ditto everythng that Bob says. Just relax and go with it. I am a singer at church, weddines and funerals all the time so I did ask for a pediatric size. That way it wouldn't hurt my vocal cords. That's what they used and I did fine. I was just so thankful to make it to the other side of the mountain.

chuckdc37
March 29th, 2009, 02:53 PM
I expected to wake up w/ a huge thing in my throat that I could see looming above my face and filling my throat and suffocating me. When I woke up I could not even see the tube as it was off to the side and then angled down totally out of sight. I had no feeling of it even being in my windpipe. When they took it out I was still out of it so I don't remember that.

Dennis S
March 29th, 2009, 03:17 PM
I have always come out of anesthesia quicker than anyone expects. I don't know how common this is, but I came to with my hands still free-and in my drugged state thought I needed to pull the thing out of my throat. As you might imagine, that doesn't work.

I had the voice of a nurse in each ear telling me I was in the hospital and needed to let go of the vent. This is odd, but I think I then had the calmest, most concentrated thought in my life-was I going to believe the voices even though it seemed like I couldn't breath? I decided I believed the voices and quit fighting. Somebody turned up some dial and I was under again. When I came to a second time it was gone.

abbanabba
March 29th, 2009, 04:30 PM
Personally I'd not stress about it. I woke up in critical care, but was in the twilight zone courtesy of the drugs. I have a vague recollection of the vent tube being removed but I was so out of it that I didn't care, and I suspect you'll be the same.

I also remember waking with it in, but have no recollection of actually feeling it. I also very vaguely remember them taking it out (I think I may have pointed to it and gestured it could come out), but I was still pretty out of it at that stage, so again, I don't recall feeling anything. Most of those first few hours are a hazy blur.

Duff Man
March 29th, 2009, 04:37 PM
people are scared of waking up with the tube in, but frankly, I worry about being able to wake up at all. I was intubated for a couple hour long surgery one time.. i woke up with it in and the nurse asked me how i felt when the anaesthesiologist took it out. I replied "like sh*t". It felt a lot like a plastic tube made of the same stuff milk jugs are made of was scratching my throat. I have to imagine it's not the hardest or most painful part. I was over it quickly.

kfay
March 29th, 2009, 05:37 PM
It's funny how everyone gets so worried about the tube. I didn't even know it was coming with my first surgery when I was 17. I remember waking with it in and struggling against it and the nurse telling me to "breathe" with the tube and I vividly remember doing just that. With my surgery last year, that was the very last of my worries, in fact, I didn't even give it a second thought.

olefin
March 29th, 2009, 06:22 PM
It's funny how everyone gets so worried about the tube. With my surgery last year, that was the very last of my worries, in fact, I didn't even give it a second thought.


Have you ever been intubated while still fully conscience? Of the 20 days I spent in the hospital during AVR it was about my worse 5 minutes while they were cramming that tube down me. And the following 5 days wasn't too funny. :rolleyes:

lilteach3234
March 29th, 2009, 08:28 PM
Dayton,
When they had to re-intubate me, I can actually say I rememberd your experience and thought if you could go thru what you did, I could do it too.

I will never fear a tube again that actually kept me breathing and saved my life. ICU was a rough time and I am so glad to be home even though I don't feel 100%.

lcwhitney
March 30th, 2009, 12:11 AM
Don't worry about the vent tube or the NG tube I quickly realized that if I relaxed and breathed with the vent i was more comfortable and less panicky. If you anesthesia doc is competent you will be asleep when you are intubated so don't stress over this too much.

Lettitia

kfay
March 30th, 2009, 04:10 AM
Have you ever been intubated while still fully conscience? Of the 20 days I spent in the hospital during AVR it was about my worse 5 minutes while they were cramming that tube down me. And the following 5 days wasn't too funny. :rolleyes:

As a matter of fact I have. Not for 5 days, but for almost a whole day. I didn't say it was funny, I just said it wasn't something that people who are presurgery need to spend a lot of time worrying about. And I don't think that I've read of anyone else on here being awake when they "crammed the tube down you". That statement is just going to scare people who are presurgery even more when it is just not something that they are going to experience.

Kim

Ross
March 30th, 2009, 04:19 AM
That statement is just going to scare people who are presurgery even more when it is just not something that they are going to experience.

Kim

If it's an emergency and there is no time to waste to sedate you, they will put it in when it has to be done RIGHT NOW. Otherwise, they will sedate you before attempting it. Docs don't like to fight trying to place the tube correctly in the airway with a patient flailing all around on them.

I can say in every instance, including one emergency, they put me out before tubing me. I've been lucky so far out of the 5 long episodes on intubation and not counting surgical intubations which are probably around 10 or so.

Should people spend time worrying about it. No. Being truthful of things that can happen need to be brought out, scary or not.

kfay
March 30th, 2009, 04:43 AM
Should people spend time worrying about it. No. Being truthful of things that can happen need to be brought out, scary or not.

Ross, Maybe I'm wrong but I don't think I've ever read on here of one other person being awake when they were intubated for this surgery. Do a poll to see.

Kim

Ross
March 30th, 2009, 05:10 AM
Ross, Maybe I'm wrong but I don't think I've ever read on here of one other person being awake when they were intubated for this surgery. Do a poll to see.

Kim

I'm sure it's probably none, but it doesn't mean that it doesn't happen sometimes. That's all.

BigOwl
March 30th, 2009, 08:21 AM
I'm glad this question came up, because my memories of intubation in my "past life" were pretty vivid, and extremely unpleasant. (I didn't mind the tubes, the coughing, the spirometer, or anything else.) But the comments on the thread have been pretty reassuring, and I'll probably be a lot more prepared to handle it well this time.

Freddie
March 30th, 2009, 08:30 AM
I slightly remember waking up with something in my mouth, it really felt like the size of wrist. When my mind was trying to "wake up" my eyes didn't want to open, this wrist size object was gone.
I didn't experience any coughing at any time during recovery, which was surprising.

sheridan07
March 30th, 2009, 11:26 AM
I was like Freddie. I woke up with it in and it didn't bother me to have it in. I thought it would have been worse but when they noticed I was fully awake, the tube was only in for a few moments until they took it out.

geebee
March 30th, 2009, 11:51 AM
I am very claustrophobic but the only time I was really bothered by the breathing tube was when they had to suction it out. I have a very strong gag reflex and suctioning made me feel like I was going to heave as well as not being able to breather momentarily. Otherwise the tube was no big deal as long as you try to relax and not fight. I also found breathing through your nose rather than trying to breathe through your mouth made it seem less invasive.

That being said, I was always happy to get it out and any discomfort from it coming out was way overshadowed by the pleasure of the tube getting its new home in the trash. In addition, your first drink after getting the tube out is better than sex (at least for that fleeting moment).;):D;)

Ter
March 30th, 2009, 12:08 PM
Vent tube was not that bad (especially compared to other things) - I was pretty awake with it in for about 6 to 8 hours - they left it in because I kept not breathing on my own, despite my daughter's encouragement to breathe (she was instructed to do so by the nurses) - I also wrote lots of notes with pad and pen - asking all sorts of questions about my blood pressure, my foley, etc - I think they all got a good laugh about my efforts to "control everything" as usual. Taking it out was not bad - felt like pulling saran wrap through my throat. You should do fine!

TakeStock
March 30th, 2009, 12:26 PM
I am very claustrophobic but the only time I was really bothered by the breathing tube was when they had to suction it out. I have a very strong gag reflex and suctioning made me feel like I was going to heave as well as not being able to breather momentarily. Otherwise the tube was no big deal as long as you try to relax and not fight. I also found breathing through your nose rather than trying to breathe through your mouth made it seem less invasive.

That being said, I was always happy to get it out and any discomfort from it coming out was way overshadowed by the pleasure of the tube getting its new home in the trash. In addition, your first drink after getting the tube out is better than sex (at least for that fleeting moment).;):D;)


I won't comment on the last line :), but you said you could breathe through your nose? I thought all air travels through your mouth via the tube? Am I wrong?

geebee
March 30th, 2009, 01:25 PM
I won't comment on the last line :), but you said you could breathe through your nose? I thought all air travels through your mouth via the tube? Am I wrong?
Not sure if it made any difference to what air was getting through but I know if I tried to breathe through my mouth, I would panic and if I concentrated on my nose breathing I was calmer. Could of just been a self-hynosis kind of thing but it worked for me.

Adrienne
March 30th, 2009, 02:17 PM
I didn't even think about breathing. I don't really think I tried to breathe on my own. If I did breathe on my own, I was not aware of it. I just remember lying there, knowing I was alive and hearing the good news and feeling relieved.

drivetopless
March 30th, 2009, 02:30 PM
Now is that supposed to make me less worried? :eek:

I'm not concerned about the pain and discomfort so much as HOW it will feel and how I can cope with the experience. My fear is I'll panic and be uncertain of how to "breathe" correctly. I suspect I'll be too groggy to panic and the nurse will be right there, but just in case, I want to be able to talk myself down. I remember panicking a bit when I had my first TEE because I wasn't used to the oxygen going up my nostrils and I couldn't swallow after the numbing spray, which made me feel like I was choking. Breathing on my own through my nose calmed me down, but I had never read about the choking sensation you can get from not being able to feel yourself swallowing, so I was unprepared. I hate being unprepared. :(

I so know what you mean! I HATED my TEE experience. It was so uncomfortable and once they started I couldn't tell them of my discomfort. I had to basically go in my head and pretend I was somewhere else to cope. Don't rape victims do that? It's not supposed to be that difficult, I think, but it was for me. Dreading my next one. I, too, do better with lots of info, so thanks for starting the thread.

BigOwl
March 30th, 2009, 06:41 PM
I am very claustrophobic but the only time I was really bothered by the breathing tube was when they had to suction it out. I have a very strong gag reflex and suctioning made me feel like I was going to heave as well as not being able to breather momentarily. Otherwise the tube was no big deal as long as you try to relax and not fight. I also found breathing through your nose rather than trying to breathe through your mouth made it seem less invasive.

That being said, I was always happy to get it out and any discomfort from it coming out was way overshadowed by the pleasure of the tube getting its new home in the trash. In addition, your first drink after getting the tube out is better than sex (at least for that fleeting moment).;):D;)

That was pretty much my experience; although I still think that the only thing better than sex is Dr. Bronner's Peppermint Soap . . .

Edit: I'd better stop talking about sex, since my daughter, aka Little Owl, has joined the forum and is now reading everything I say.

olefin
March 31st, 2009, 10:42 AM
And I don't think that I've read of anyone else on here being awake when they "crammed the tube down you". That statement is just going to scare people who are presurgery even more when it is just not something that they are going to experience.

Kim

Hey, so it scares someone, I'm just stating the facts that happen. So you have been intubated while still fully conscience?

If you read my first post you would have seen this.

Most likely your surgery will be routine. You will be unconsciousness when they cram that tube down you and you will be so druggie when they take it out that you won't remember a thing.

My surgery was far from routine.


Dayton,
When they had to re-intubate me, I can actually say I rememberd your experience and thought if you could go thru what you did, I could do it too.

I will never fear a tube again that actually kept me breathing and saved my life. ICU was a rough time and I am so glad to be home even though I don't feel 100%.
1 Day Ago 07:22 PM

lilteach3234, thanks you.
I feel the same way. It was very unpleasant but it saved my life. Had they not acted as fast I might not be here today or could have had brain damage.
Hope you are feeling better real soon.

geebee
March 31st, 2009, 10:59 AM
Scary or not, I think it is very important to let people know what might happen now matter how rare. If they do not know of the "bad" things, and it happens to them, they will be a lot more scared thinking it is indicative of something very serious when it might be rather routine.

I think the majority of members here want the whole truth or they wouldn't be members. They came here looking for answers.

kfay
March 31st, 2009, 11:15 AM
Have you ever been intubated while still fully conscience? Of the 20 days I spent in the hospital during AVR it was about my worse 5 minutes while they were cramming that tube down me. And the following 5 days wasn't too funny. :rolleyes:

Olefin, When I said that it was funny that everyone was worried about tube, I meant it in an ironic sense since there are so many obvious other things to worry about (but you probably don't know what that means). Obviously, nothing about this surgery is "funny", I know, I've been through two and will have two or three more in my life time. Not to mention, I was admitted to the hospital over 100 times before I was 17 years old. I have had more than my fair share of experiences in the hospital and I'm sure many more than you, even though I am many years younger than you....I didn't attack you or anyone else on here so you can just ROLLEYES at yourself! REALLY

Mary
March 31st, 2009, 11:19 AM
If you're having a scheduled surgery, you'll be sedated when they intubate you.

My husband intubates patients maybe 2-3 times a shift, and even when it's an emergency situation, they sedate.

Ross
March 31st, 2009, 11:39 AM
Perhaps we should just skip the intubation and go straight to sex. :D

Mary
March 31st, 2009, 11:42 AM
Perhaps we should just skip the intubation and go straight to sex. :D

You sweet talker you!;)

Mary
March 31st, 2009, 11:43 AM
TakeStock is in surgery today, so we'll have to ask him what intubation felt like when he returns.;)

geebee
March 31st, 2009, 12:47 PM
Perhaps we should just skip the intubation and go straight to sex. :D
Where, Where? ;):D;)

BigOwl
April 1st, 2009, 07:48 PM
On the post-surgery sex thread.

Am I missing something, or has anybody heard from TakeStock?

terodac
April 1st, 2009, 08:09 PM
I worried about the same thing before my surgery. I left instructions to my husband to get that thing out of me asap! I woke up, Thanked God I had made it, knew it was in my throat but did not feel it or care! My husband told me we will get that out ASAP, my best friend wiped my eyes Oh that was wonderful because they had been taped down. Make sure someone does this for you! That helped me more than anything I could see!!!! Then they removed my tube! One quick pull it was over and I was good to go! You don't feel or remember much of anything after surgery! Good Luck!

luvsgod
April 1st, 2009, 08:38 PM
Most likely you will be so doped up, you won't even think about whether you are breathing on your own or not, etc., etc.

I do remember trying to cough and not being able to make a sound, but other than that, I just listened to the good news my husband and then my surgeon told me, gave the thumbs-up sign, and then went back into la-la land.

I just had my second AVR on 3/2. I had this surgery at UAB but I had a terrible experience in CVICU. Per the Dr.'s orders, I could not have "anything" for pain until I had been off the respirator around and hour. I could not slow my breathing down to an acceptable rate to remove the respirator (I think it was because I was in such severe pain) so I ended up not getting anything for pain well into the second day after my surgery. I have been though a lot of pain in my life time but this was definitely the worse. Always make sure with your surgeon before the surgery what the plan of care is for controlling your pain.

Ross
April 2nd, 2009, 03:08 AM
I just had my second AVR on 3/2. I had this surgery at UAB but I had a terrible experience in CVICU. Per the Dr.'s orders, I could not have "anything" for pain until I had been off the respirator around and hour. I could not slow my breathing down to an acceptable rate to remove the respirator (I think it was because I was in such severe pain) so I ended up not getting anything for pain well into the second day after my surgery. I have been though a lot of pain in my life time but this was definitely the worse. Always make sure with your surgeon before the surgery what the plan of care is for controlling your pain.

I think I would have shot him. I can understand part of his logic, because if your too dopey, you won't breath on your own, but that's not a valid reason for not controlling pain.

StephR
April 3rd, 2009, 01:24 PM
I was freaked out about the vent tube pre-op. My surgeon said he would do his best to remove it before I woke, which put me slightly at ease. When I woke up I noticed the tube was still in since I couldn't speak. I remained calm which was very easy since I was so drowsy. The next thing I remember was a male voice saying they were going to take the tube out. I don't remember having any pain or discomfort during this process however, my Dad said that I really winced when they removed it. Needless to say, once the tube was removed, my throat was surprisingly not sore. I was just very thirsty and couldn't get enough ice chips! Going in I thought the tube was going the worst part and it ended up being insignificant!!

TakeStock
April 3rd, 2009, 02:12 PM
On the post-surgery sex thread.

Am I missing something, or has anybody heard from TakeStock?


BigOwl, sorry I didn't reply sooner. I was so tired I couldn't keep my eyes open. The intubation was remarkably painfree. Of course everything is painfree when you are so tired you can't stay awake for more than 30 secs. (I said secs not "sex" :)) The nurse turned on the full lights and turned on the TV to "harass" me awake. The eventually left the tube in but disconnected the oxygen just to see if I was breathing -- it was weird hearing my breathing over the ventilalator. Towards the end I was just dying of thirst. I really don't know how you can go more than 14 hrs like I did and deal with the thirst. The didn't put any water in my mouth the whole time, so I was loving the ice chips I got when they finally took it out. Of course then I find out they try to limit you fluid in take for several days after surgery, so I would only get about 8 oz of Sierra Mist for the next several hours when I was finally cleared for liquids.

Lynlw
April 3rd, 2009, 03:15 PM
I just had my second AVR on 3/2. I had this surgery at UAB but I had a terrible experience in CVICU. Per the Dr.'s orders, I could not have "anything" for pain until I had been off the respirator around and hour. I could not slow my breathing down to an acceptable rate to remove the respirator (I think it was because I was in such severe pain) so I ended up not getting anything for pain well into the second day after my surgery. I have been though a lot of pain in my life time but this was definitely the worse. Always make sure with your surgeon before the surgery what the plan of care is for controlling your pain.

THAT is awful, I can't imagine how I would have acted if my son was treated like you were. BUT it is really good advice to talk to your surgeon about pain care before surgery, we ALSO discuss pain control with the Anesthesea team when we have the preop test day and meet everyone. I'm sorry you had to go thru that, it sounds horrific, did you have your first surgery there?

witzkeyman
April 3rd, 2009, 04:30 PM
BigOwl, sorry I didn't reply sooner. I was so tired I couldn't keep my eyes open. The intubation was remarkably painfree. Of course everything is painfree when you are so tired you can't stay awake for more than 30 secs. (I said secs not "sex" :)) The nurse turned on the full lights and turned on the TV to "harass" me awake. The eventually left the tube in but disconnected the oxygen just to see if I was breathing -- it was weird hearing my breathing over the ventilalator. Towards the end I was just dying of thirst. I really don't know how you can go more than 14 hrs like I did and deal with the thirst. The didn't put any water in my mouth the whole time, so I was loving the ice chips I got when they finally took it out. Of course then I find out they try to limit you fluid in take for several days after surgery, so I would only get about 8 oz of Sierra Mist for the next several hours when I was finally cleared for liquids.

those ice chips were heaven.:) I told my girlfriend I wanted to buy a machine that made ice chips that shape and texture. I haven't thought of ice chips since, but the taste of those ice chips were fantastic. thanks for the memories.

BigOwl
April 3rd, 2009, 08:02 PM
I'm just glad you made it through this (for some of us) very scary part of the process, TakeStock. I found your post on the other thread--but glad to have you back, having your way with puns and such. Your sense of humor wasn't lost in the operation at least!

olefin
April 4th, 2009, 07:55 AM
During my last 5 day session on the respirator the tv was on showing a commercial of toilet bowl being flushed. That was the only thing that caught my attention. I thought at the time I could have drank the water in that toilet, for I was so thirsty.

Ross
April 4th, 2009, 08:07 AM
those ice chips were heaven.:) I told my girlfriend I wanted to buy a machine that made ice chips that shape and texture. I haven't thought of ice chips since, but the taste of those ice chips were fantastic. thanks for the memories.

This is a little off subject, but we did a poll once to find out how many of us liked to suck on ice cubes and it was surprising large. I'm not just talking after surgery, but all the time since surgery.

http://www.valvereplacement.com/forums/showthread.php?t=12371

BigOwl
April 4th, 2009, 08:47 AM
Just don't chew on it! Bad for the teeth.

rckrzy1
April 4th, 2009, 10:05 AM
My wife says I fought like crazy to get it out but don't remember much of it.
I DO remember dieing of thirst. And after a while the nurse made the mistake of leaving the water jug in reach of my lips and I drank the whole thing, which had them upset.

I wish BEFORE hand someone would have explained too much water can be a very bad thing after surgery, I had no idea. Not sure if it attributed or not but 4-5 days post op I had CHF from fluid build up.

But hey I SURVIVED it and you will too.

WilliamJE
April 4th, 2009, 04:26 PM
You can write and you can give people the US Hand Signal for Obscene Contempt while intubated, and that covers a surprising number of the needs you may have at that time.

Make sure you have someone there with paper and pen or multiple pencils.

Try telling the nurse you need to write something and have them refuse to give you anything that happened to me.

First they had trouble intubating me, I therefore spent the first day with tube in my throat. The reason- they feared having to tube me again and not being able to.

Then the 2nd night I got pnemonia and they put me on cpap. Early the nxt morning I began gagging on my tongue. I couldn't tell this to anyone, because the cpap didn't allow me to talk and the nurse wouldn't give me anything to write with.

ccummins
April 4th, 2009, 06:28 PM
I hate to say it but I hated that damn tube. It is my worst memory of my surgery. That being said it came out pretty quickly and all is well as it will be for you. The thirst though ... I will never take water for granted again. I had a nurse that gave into my pleads for water. I promptly vomited it up. I never did get ice chips. They gave me little sponge lollipops.

axeldog
April 4th, 2009, 10:03 PM
I woke at 3 pm and the tube was taken out at 6 pm. Not too bad but it was more comfortable when they finally pulled it out. After that I remember how good ice chips tasted.

axeldog
April 4th, 2009, 10:09 PM
Just look at it as another step to recovery.

Megan
April 5th, 2009, 06:18 AM
i remember the tube very well too-i have a very big gag reflex and couldnt stop gagging so they gave me meds to put me back to sleep i think. just try to do what everyone is saying here and give in to it and dont fight it. tell your family or whoever will be with you to watch out for this and speak up to docs to put you back to sleep but they should know this already anyways.

Ross
April 5th, 2009, 07:27 AM
Just don't chew on it! Bad for the teeth.

What teeth? :D

tobagotwo
April 5th, 2009, 08:47 AM
Try telling the nurse you need to write something and have them refuse to give you anything that happened to me. This is why you must have someone there - a spouse or someone else who will not back down - with a paper and pencil. There is no excuse for the behavior of the nurse in this example, but there are always a few like that lurking around.

They will also tell your spouse that he or she should leave, any time they are going to do something. Baloney! My spouse took root in my room, and they had to do everything under her watchful eye. Your spouse/parent/advocate should be in the room with you when things are done, such as extubation. That's how you and they can be sure the right things are being done. Of course, they shouldn't get in the way, but there is always room in a corner, and there's no secret magic being done here that needs to be hidden from the audience.

Best wishes,

Reddog
April 5th, 2009, 03:50 PM
Hmm.... all this talk about intubation has me scared about... the other end. Is the urinary catheter inserted and removed while you're still asleep?

WayneGM
April 5th, 2009, 04:45 PM
Hmm.... all this talk about intubation has me scared about... the other end. Is the urinary catheter inserted and removed while you're still asleep?

Thank goodness it was inserted while I was asleep. I was awake when they took it out and I feared the worse.....for nothing. It came out easily and I didn't feel a thing.

palmaceae
April 5th, 2009, 04:55 PM
Hmm.... all this talk about intubation has me scared about... the other end. Is the urinary catheter inserted and removed while you're still asleep?

They insert it while you are asleep, but take it out when you are awake. Feels weird but no pain. Now I had the unfortunate experience last year when I had kidney stones, the day before my surgery to remove the stones. Well I got one stuck in my urinary tract, so could not relieve myself. Had to wait in ER for over 1 hour in total pain, they finally got me in and had this inexperienced nurse try to insert a catheter, while being fully awake. Normally that is not too bad but remember I had a stuck stone. So while inserting it it hit the stone, talk about pain, I almost passed out! After attempting this 4 times they finally got a specialist and took him 1 try. That is not an experience I would want again!

TakeStock
April 5th, 2009, 05:41 PM
Hmm.... all this talk about intubation has me scared about... the other end. Is the urinary catheter inserted and removed while you're still asleep?


No need to be worried about intubation. It really turned about to be no big deal. The urinary cath is installed while you're asleep, along with everything else. I had mine in for several days and it felt a little weird especially when they moved the tube around so I could get out of bed. I'm not sure why the cath tube, not the part they insert, is so wide and bulky. I guess they don't want to accidently bend it and cause it to block. If you're a guy, I believe it's kept in with some of balloon and it would make me very nervous when my wife walked by it -- I didn't want to find out what would happen if she tripped over the tube. Taking it out was painless. Watching how the nurse did it, I believe they used a suringe to pull out the air in the balloon so it could slide right out. There's a small IV type plug on the tube for where the suringe is inserted. Anyway, nothing to worry about.:cool:

ccummins
April 5th, 2009, 06:34 PM
Hmm.... all this talk about intubation has me scared about... the other end. Is the urinary catheter inserted and removed while you're still asleep?
I was out when it was inserted and awake when it was taken out. No pain at all though, just a little tugging.

SHEEPDOG
April 5th, 2009, 07:18 PM
...and then they blow up a little balloon that keeps it in place. I knew it was there and do remember the nurse telling me not to bite it but that is it. DRUGS are the word of the day. Baring any BIG problems, it should come out shortly after waking. I remember consciously working on my breathing to show anyone that was around I was able to breathe on my own. Taking it out was really fast and I don't remember that too much either. I was stressed too but for no reason.
You will be fine!

PS. With it in the TRACHEA, you should be able to swallow. The balloon keeps STUFF from going into the LUNGS. The only way to breathe is through the tube.

WilliamJE
April 6th, 2009, 03:48 PM
Typically the cath is installed while you are asleep, however on my 2nd trip into the hospital they had to install one while I was awake. That really sucked, nothing else I can say about it.

Taking it out is a non issue.Someone just needs to read my signature line to know how I feel about re-inserted catheters. :eek:

COLLEEN S
April 13th, 2009, 12:32 AM
Now is that supposed to make me less worried? :eek:

I'm not concerned about the pain and discomfort so much as HOW it will feel and how I can cope with the experience. My fear is I'll panic and be uncertain of how to "breathe" correctly. I suspect I'll be too groggy to panic and the nurse will be right there, but just in case, I want to be able to talk myself down. I remember panicking a bit when I had my first TEE because I wasn't used to the oxygen going up my nostrils and I couldn't swallow after the numbing spray, which made me feel like I was choking. Breathing on my own through my nose calmed me down, but I had never read about the choking sensation you can get from not being able to feel yourself swallowing, so I was unprepared. I hate being unprepared. :(


I was the same way. I woke up after the 1st surg. intubated and panicked. I couldnt breathe. So now that you know that, you will know NOT to panic...right?

BigOwl
April 17th, 2009, 06:27 AM
Having made it through a second intubation less well than the first, even, I have one piece of advice. If you have a strong gag reflex (can't get your toothbrush too far back in your mouth without gagging?), make sure the anaesthesiologist knows this. I had trouble communicating the problem, and a nurse kept saying she was going to give me something for the nausea--and I didn't have any; I was simply gagging.

Be prepared for sore throats through the hospital stay and possibly longer. They gave me a spray-in topical anaesthetic that tasted like sweetened carbolic acid, but it helped. So did ice chips. And remember that the process doesn't take very long, especially if you're not freaked out.